🗂️ [[Thinking in Public]] # I-You-We 📰 **A transcultural performer training paradigm, developed in collaboration with [[Hoyoung Tak]] and [[Younghee Park]] that supports the work of [[Company Bad]].** 🕵🏻‍♂️ *I You We, I, You, We* ✍🏻 [[Jeremy Neideck]], [[Hoyoung Tak]], [[Younghee Park]] ## 📖 Overview A transcultural performer training paradigm, developed in collaboration with [[Hoyoung Tak]] and [[Younghee Park]] that supports our collaborations, including the work of [[Company Bad]] and which the three of us perpetuate in our own teaching and creative practices. [[I-You-We]], is shorthand for the capacity that we are attempting to build in ourselves and our ensembles to locate the work that we make within a constellation of: - I - A compassionate and detailed sense of self, built on physical/social/cultural awareness and discipline - You - A healthy and productive kinship between individuals who together form an ensemble/company/team - We - “An exciting, engaging, and responsive relationship between the ensemble/company/team and their audience/community/world This is how I described in my 2018 chapter *[[Jeremy Neideck - We Need to Keep One Eye Open... Approaching butoh at sites of personal and cultural resistance|We Need to Keep One Eye Open... Approaching butoh at sites of personal and cultural resistance]]*: > As a way of moving past the second cycle of creative development and bringing other artists back into the collaboration, Hoyoung, Younghee, and I began to develop a language around the way that we wished to position the audience, and strategies for reconciling what we individually perceived as models of best practices in performance making. The framework we devised took the title ‘I-You-We’, an approach to performance making which describes the dynamics of the relationships between performer, ensemble, and audience: > > - I: The relationship the artist has with the self, built on physical awareness and discipline. > - You: The relationship between selves built upon a keen awareness and connection to the ensemble. > - We: The relationship between the ensemble and the audience. > > The seeds of this approach lie in Korean performing arts and in particular masked dance dramas such as Bongsan talchum which are incredibly masterful in their rigor, but they have a history of being performed without clear distinctions between performers and their audience (M.-H. Kim 1997 24). P’ansori similarly exhibits an intimate relationship between the singer – who traditionally performs solo – and the audience, who are offer up ch’uimsae , or “stylized cries of encouragement” (Park 2003 , 234) to the vocalist. This is not seen as a one-way relationship with the audience doting on the performer. Instead, it is a way for the audience to identify more ​​closely with the work, opening themselves up to the cathartic process of *shinmyŏng* experienced by those on the stage (NCKTPA 2004 , 53). These traditions have found their way into contemporary Korean theatre practice through ~~Oh T’ae-sŏk~~, regarded as one of Asia’s most original working dramatists and directors (A.-J. Kim and Graves 1999). Based on practices taken from *madanggŭk* (dramas performed in outdoor spaces such as courtyards and marketplaces) and *kamyŏn’gŭk* (masked dance dramas), ~~Oh T’ae-sŏk~~ has pushed this traditionally high regard for the audience so far that his actors deliver most of their dialogue directly facing them (11). This is not considered by ~~Oh~~ to be direct address, rather a re-imagining of the audience as a mirror through which the actors can calculate the angle of their gaze in order to connect to other members of the ensemble. ([[Jeremy Neideck - We Need to Keep One Eye Open... Approaching butoh at sites of personal and cultural resistance|Neideck, 2018]], [pp. 350-351](https://read.readwise.io/read/01hwxraqtbcnpdybyc1qea92v4)) ## 📝 Notes - The newer articulation of the three relationships above sprung out in preparation for my [[2024 The S Word Paper]], and is something I would love to talk to [[Hoyoung Tak]] and [[Younghee Park]] about. ## ⛲ Sources - [[Jeremy Neideck - We Need to Keep One Eye Open... Approaching butoh at sites of personal and cultural resistance|We Need to Keep One Eye Open... Approaching butoh at sites of personal and cultural resistance (Neideck, 2018)]] # **Created**: [[2024-04-07|Sunday 07 April 2024]] **Published**: [[2024-05-03|Friday 03 May 2024]] **Updated**: 13:16 [[2024-05-05|Sunday 05 May 2024]]